In commemoration of the United Nations’ day to end crimes against journalists, the International Press Centre (IPC) organised a media interactive session.

 Mba

Mba

In commemoration of the United Nations’ day to end crimes against journalists, the International Press Centre (IPC) organised a media interactive session.

The event, which held yesterday at the centre in Lagos was supported by the Nigerian Journalists Safety Initiative (NJSI) and the Open Society Foundation (OSF).

An Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) Frank Mba said the safety of journalists was paramount to the police.

He stressed: “The nature of journalism has inherent risks attached to it. This is where journalists and police have a convergence; whenever there is danger, the two head towards there while others run away.”

He lamented that contrary to the Bible verse that says, ‘the truth shall set you free’ telling the truth often lands journalists in trouble.

Mba said the lifestyle of media practitioners predisposes them to danger; having to work late and leaving late back home.

According to him: “The job pattern puts them under intense pressure, there is the need to re-examine some of these issues and have some protective precaution.

“Your life is more important than anything as it is only a man who is alive has a by-line.”

Lagos State Commissioner for Information and Strategy, Steve Ayorinde, who was represented by the Director, Public Enlightenment and Community Relations, Mr. Toyin Adeni-Awosika, said government was doing much to ensure the safety of journalists in the state.

The Director of IPC, Mr. Lanre Arogundade, said the major concern was that many crimes committed against journalists were never prosecuted.

Source:The Guardian NigeriaThe Guardian Nigeria