No government has ever had a hundred per cent support from the people but some supporters of the opposition can be won over after the election. This all depends on good leadership. According to John Maxwell: “everything rises and falls on leadership…”. While leadership can be blamed, it is also expedient to emphasize the fact that in a representative government, the government is a sample of the entire populace. Hence, the shortcomings of politicians portrays the moral state of the populace from which they emanate.

The Guinean populace has experienced successive governments with their corresponding turbulence over the years. The divergent opinion of individuals does not only state the differences in the populace but may also portray the self-deception of some as diplomacy and unpatriotic solidarity of an individual may blind him to the shortcomings of a government.

While the Guinean economy does not look very attractive, insecurity and political crisis are preponderant. Sociopolitical crisis comprises mining issues, protest demonstrations across mining companies and teachers institute denouncing irregularities of the authorities. This may have to do with wages paid for artisanal miners and bursary delays for students.

Socioeconomic issues noted are lack of potable water, constant power supply, increment in fuel price and other essential commodities and bad road networks. While all these linger, politicians still contest using the same old promises: development of infrastructure and provision of employment.

The rate of crime in the country is accrued to the rate of government insufficiency in many areas of the economy. The increment in food commodities and basic social amenities is considered as one of the causes of increased criminality in the country. The same way the rate of road accidents across the country is due to bad roads and partly due to negligence of commercial road users. The high rate of landslide (hazard) also boils down to the inability of the authorities to promulgate laws binding on mining operations and sanction of its defaulters.

While the Guinean challenges on the political scene reflect on the economy, the populace’s ardent support for politicians remains unwavering. However, the continuous support of the people for erring top leaders and their profession of undying support accrues most of the sociopolitical and socioeconomic woes to the people.